fbpx

Upcycled Succulent Project

I spotted this sad and lonely set of bedside drawers on the roadside ready for a hard rubbish collection….and immediately knew what I wanted to do with them. An upcycled succulent project – yes Succulents in Drawers!

With a bit of prep work and a coat of paint to jazz them up they were ready to go.

My hints when looking for furniture to use as planters;

1. Look for a stury frame and base – you want it to be able to hold the weight of potting mix and plants!

2. Go for something with interesting shape or texture – don’t panic about its colour (you can always change that).

3. Remember your plants will need to either have drainage holes or you’ll need to prep the planter to cope with no drainage holes (see my tip in the video).

4. Hunt down roadside hard rubbish collections, flea markets, second hand stores and your local Facebook Buy Swap Sell or Freebie pages. And remember to keep an open mind!

A coat of paint on your upcycled furniture can make the world of difference to look of the finished piece.

For this upcycled succulent project I’ve chosen to use black spray paint and I’ve masked off some areas so they remain the original timber colour – because I love the contrasting look.

I picked black because I love the way plants really pop against it and because it modernises the retro piece a bit.

I used a wood furniture polish to bring out the colour in the original timber parts too.

For the full instructions on this upcycled succulent project scroll down and watch the video.

And taa daa here it is finished! A upcycled drawer work of art on my front doorstep.

Now my tip for watering these babies is to use either a large needleless syringe (you can get them from pharmacies) or a small watering can with a very narrow spout. Either way they won’t need much water at all and when you do water make sure you direct it at the base of each plant and not over the foliage or over your upcycled drawers.

So start hunting around your local op shops or hard rubbish collections (if you are allowed) and pick up an old neglected piece of furniture and give it an upcycled makeover. You can also check out our other succulent projects or why not try your hand at some creative, inspirational potted garden projects.

Gardenette Chloe x

How to grow plants in pots SUCCESSFULLY!

If you love growing a potted garden, then you’ll need some of these tops tips for success when growing in pots. Let Chloe show you how to grow plants in pots SUCCESSFULLY!

1. Choose the right size pot for your plant. Not too big and not too small. A pot that is too big is a bit of a waste of space and the proportions look all wrong. While a pot that is too small can’t stunt the growth of your plant. As a guide choose a pot that is 2-3 times the size of the original pot of the plant.

2. Choose the right type of pot; self watering pots are perfect for herbs and vegetables or annual flowers. While lightweight pots are great if you need to move pots around a lot.

3. Prevent potting mix from becoming hydrophobic (that’s repelling water) by using a wetting product like eco-hydrate https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/produ…

Liked this video? Please give it a thumbs up and don’t forget to subscribe. Check out more videos on our channel here- https://www.youtube.com/thegardenettes

Our fav indoor hanging plants

Nothing creates the feeling of an indoor jungle quite like house plants with tarzan like vines cascading down from above. So when you’re decorating your house with greenery, don’t just introduce plants at ground level, spice things up a bit and create interest from top to bottom.

Our favourite indoor hanging, trailing and cascading plants:

– Devil’s Ivy
– Chain of Hearts
– String of Pearls
– Boston Fern

All pots used in this video can be found in the Northcote Pottery Range at https://www.northcotepottery.com/

Create a succulent ball

I love a bit of garden art so I’m going to create a living succulent ball that can be a hanging feature in your garden.

Here’s what you’ll need:

2 good sized hanging baskets
A stylish selection of succulents
Quality potting mix
A piece of cardboard
Cable ties
A few pieces of floristy wire

I’m using matching Stratford Hanging Baskets from Northcote Pottery’s Clyde Garden Collection. The detail on them is bird cage like, which is wonderfully decorative and there’s plenty of room for planting succulents.

Start by filling both of the baskets with potting mix. Now the tricky bit is joining the two baskets to form a sphere – so here’s a neat trick. Simply place a piece of cardboard over the top of one of the baskets, put the two halves together and gently slide the cardboard out. Then firmly secure the baskets with cable ties.

Now comes the fun part the planting. I’ve chosen a selection of Echeveria’s from InStyle succulents. I’m using different colors and forms for extra impact. So I’ve got some darker forms like ‘Painted Lady’ which has burgundy coming through the foliage and ‘Black Knight’ which has burgundy or almost black tips and then some silver forms for real contrast.

These plants have been grown as plugs so they’ve only got a small root system which makes them perfect for this style of planting. Now all you need to do is cut little holes into your hanging basket liner and pop them in. If they are a little insecure just get your hands on some floristry wire and you can pin them in.

If you’re finding it tricky to get underneath then try resting the basket on a pot to do the lower half and remember to secure any loose succulents with floristry wire. Now all you need to do is reattach some of the wires from the hanging basket were removed earlier and it’s ready to display in the garden. The perfect garden disco ball!

How get rid of black flies around indoor plants – Fungus Gnats

The pesky little black or grey flies darting around your indoor plants are fungus gnats!

While the flying adults are just plain annoying, it’s the larvae which live in the potting mix that can be doing some serious harm to your plants.

The adult flies lay their eggs into the potting mix and the teenie tiny, larvae hatch out and feed on organic matter including plant roots and soft tender stems. This can cause wilting and slow the growth rate of your plants right down.

But there are 3 simple ways to get rid your fungus gnat problems!

Number 1 – DO NOT overwater your plants. Fungus gnats love wet potting mix and outbreaks most often occur when the soil isn’t allowed to dry out between waterings. The eggs and larvae need continuous moisture to survive, so allowing the soil to dry out before you wanter can help break the lifecycle.

Number 2 – Kill the larvae in the potting mix using a soil drench of eco-neem. This is really easy to do – simply mix up the right dilution in large bucket. Then take each of your plants and allow them to soak in the mix until the air bubbles have stopped. Let them drain outside in the shade, before bringing them back inside. You’ll need to repeat this soil drench in 7 days because the flying adults can live for a week or more.

Number 3 – Do NOT allow water to pool around the roots of your plants. So tip out excess water that may gather in cover pots or saucers after watering. Leaving it will just encourage algae to grow, which the fungus gnats will just feed on!

So don’t let fungus gnats invade your indoor plant jungle and remember….there is anyways room for one more plant!

You can buy eco-neem from Bunnings & all good garden centres OR online here: https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/produ…

Grow your own mushrooms

Check out or buy these kits here

Coffee lovers listen up! Our favourite drink also produces a TONNE of waste….in fact – in Melbourne CBD alone it’s estimated that nearly 5000 tonnes of ground coffee waste is thrown away every. single. week.

But thanks to a couple of clever lads, some of this coffee waste is being used to grow mushrooms! Life Cykel Mushrooms grow their shrooms on urban farms in shipping containers and then cleverly selling the super fresh mushies back to the cafes who gave them the coffee grounds! But so we can all be mushroom farmers – they created these brilliant Home grown Mushroom Boxes.

These kits grow the stunning Oyster Mushrooms which have a velvety texture, smooth taste and dense nutrient content. They’re also packed with B vitamins, calcium, phosphorous and iron – in fact they often get called the vegetarian steak!

Getting them growing at home is simple. Just open the grow window, cut a cross in the plastic and then mist the opening with water twice a day. All that white stuff inside the plastic is the mycelium or mushroom roots – that have grown in the waste coffee grounds and are revved up, ready to grow once you open the bag and add humidity.

You don’t need to put these babies in the dark – just keep them sitting on your kitchen bench and the crop will be ready to harvest in about 7-10 days. But as soon as you notice they aren’t doubling in size each day, you can pick the entire crop. And each mushroom kit will give you 2-3 flushes of growth, just turn the plastic bag around!

Cook these up however you fancy, but I can’t go past mushrooms on toast. Of course though, this classic cafe dish wouldn’t be hipster without a sprinkle of microgreens….but don’t worry there is a coffee waste kit for that too!