How get rid of black flies around indoor plants – Fungus Gnats

The pesky little black or grey flies darting around your indoor plants are fungus gnats!

While the flying adults are just plain annoying, it’s the larvae which live in the potting mix that can be doing some serious harm to your plants.

The adult flies lay their eggs into the potting mix and the teenie tiny, larvae hatch out and feed on organic matter including plant roots and soft tender stems. This can cause wilting and slow the growth rate of your plants right down.

But there are 3 simple ways to get rid your fungus gnat problems!

Number 1 – DO NOT overwater your plants. Fungus gnats love wet potting mix and outbreaks most often occur when the soil isn’t allowed to dry out between waterings. The eggs and larvae need continuous moisture to survive, so allowing the soil to dry out before you wanter can help break the lifecycle.

Number 2 – Kill the larvae in the potting mix using a soil drench of eco-neem. This is really easy to do – simply mix up the right dilution in large bucket. Then take each of your plants and allow them to soak in the mix until the air bubbles have stopped. Let them drain outside in the shade, before bringing them back inside. You’ll need to repeat this soil drench in 7 days because the flying adults can live for a week or more.

Number 3 – Do NOT allow water to pool around the roots of your plants. So tip out excess water that may gather in cover pots or saucers after watering. Leaving it will just encourage algae to grow, which the fungus gnats will just feed on!

So don’t let fungus gnats invade your indoor plant jungle and remember….there is anyways room for one more plant!

You can buy eco-neem from Bunnings & all good garden centres OR online here: https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/produ…

Grow your own mushrooms

Check out or buy these kits here

Coffee lovers listen up! Our favourite drink also produces a TONNE of waste….in fact – in Melbourne CBD alone it’s estimated that nearly 5000 tonnes of ground coffee waste is thrown away every. single. week.

But thanks to a couple of clever lads, some of this coffee waste is being used to grow mushrooms! Life Cykel Mushrooms grow their shrooms on urban farms in shipping containers and then cleverly selling the super fresh mushies back to the cafes who gave them the coffee grounds! But so we can all be mushroom farmers – they created these brilliant Home grown Mushroom Boxes.

These kits grow the stunning Oyster Mushrooms which have a velvety texture, smooth taste and dense nutrient content. They’re also packed with B vitamins, calcium, phosphorous and iron – in fact they often get called the vegetarian steak!

Getting them growing at home is simple. Just open the grow window, cut a cross in the plastic and then mist the opening with water twice a day. All that white stuff inside the plastic is the mycelium or mushroom roots – that have grown in the waste coffee grounds and are revved up, ready to grow once you open the bag and add humidity.

You don’t need to put these babies in the dark – just keep them sitting on your kitchen bench and the crop will be ready to harvest in about 7-10 days. But as soon as you notice they aren’t doubling in size each day, you can pick the entire crop. And each mushroom kit will give you 2-3 flushes of growth, just turn the plastic bag around!

Cook these up however you fancy, but I can’t go past mushrooms on toast. Of course though, this classic cafe dish wouldn’t be hipster without a sprinkle of microgreens….but don’t worry there is a coffee waste kit for that too!

A kids friendly vegetable garden

I’m going to create a pint sized patch – perfect for kids!

It’s gonna be filled with kid-friendly vegetables, oodles of pretty edible flowers and I’m gonna do it all organically.

I’ve chosen a range autumn and winter growing veggies to suit the coming seasons, but of course if you are planting in spring or summer then you’d reach for kids favourites like tomatoes, cucumbers and corn. I’ve already mixed through some compost into these veggie planters, so they are ready to go.

My kids go mad for peas, I’m going to plant 2 types. A snow pea and also a podding variety called Bounty. Now both of these are dwarf varieties which means they won’t need staking and their pickings will be in easy kiddie reach! This Bounty variety is a really early cropper, in just 7 -10 weeks we’ll be picking handfuls of full sized pods.

Next in goes some broccoli ‘Bambino’, this is one of the branching broccoli’s, so it will still produce a central head but if you lop that off when it’s about the size of a 10 cent piece you’ll get oodles of side shoots that you can pick for months.

Kids love colour, so I can’t forget this rainbow silverbeet – these brightly coloured stems keep their colour, even when cooked!

And you can’t bet mini carrots for a quick veggie garden snack. This is a variety called “Little Fingers” and they are ready to harvest in 4-6 weeks – and best of all they’re perfect picked when they’re about 8cm long.

To really make this patch eye-poppingly pretty I’m going to include some edible flowers too – you can use these to decorate cakes or toss through a salad. I can’t forget some herbs either – these Mixed Punnet Eziplanters are super handy coz you get 6 different herbs all in 1 punnet.

Get the kids excited about these veggies growing and get them involved in caring for the patch as well. So once a fortnight give the plants a dose of the certified organic fertiliser eco-aminogro and then to really amp up production pop in some eco-seaweed too.

With this organic combo your veggies will be sweeter and more tender, which of course the kids will love and with this productive bunch of plants you’ll be picking from the patch in no time!

How to plant a bee friendly garden

Bee’s – what’s all the buzz about and why do we need them in our garden?

When I tell you that 1 in mouthfuls of the food that we eat is thanks to the work of bees and that 90% of all food crops are pollinated by bees… then you begin to understand just how important these supply!

So attracting bees into your garden not only helps pollinate your fruit and veggies, but it can actually help pollinate fruit and vegies on farms up to five kilometres away – because bees will travel that far for the sweet nectar.

Creating a bee-friendly garden at your place is easy – it can be as simple as some pots of flowering plants or as elaborate as a full flowering mass planted border just make sure you’ve got things in flower in every season.

Bright and sweetly scented flowers like these Bidens are irresistible to bees and I can smell why! Bidens are long flowering with a low growing habit and masses of these sunshine yellow, long-lasting flowers. They love full sun and a good trim back once they’ve finished flowering.

You could also try including some Pentas to bring in the bees – these tiny star-shaped flowers come in red, white or lavender shades and the bees just love them! Cut these plants back hard in winter to encourage oodles of new growth in the spring.

Now of course once you’ve attracted bees into your garden you want to make sure that you’re not going to harm them or worse kill them! So if you need to use an insecticide or a fungicide choose one from the eco organic garden range these are certified organic and absolutely safe for bees. Check out the range from eco organic garden here: https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/

What’s wrong with my roses?

What’s wrong with my roses? Whether you’ve got lots of plants or just one rose bush, this is a really common question!

So here are some simple solutions, to solve your rose riddles.

1. Not getting many blooms? Time to dead head your roses AND feed them up! Dead-heading your rose is…dead easy. Simply prune off the spent flower head but don’t just cut off the head, cut the stem as if you were cutting a long stemmed rose for the vase. You can also encourage a bigger flush of repeat blooms, by cutting the plant back a third and feeding it up with organic fertilisers (Chloe’s favourites are eco-aminogro and eco-seaweed).

2. Watch out for Black Spot, a fungal disease that gets into the leaf, causing distinctive black spots. The best way to stop it weakening your rose is to prevent it getting into the leaf in the first place. Pick off any infected leaves and pop them straight into the rubbish bin. Then give the plant a drenching spray all over with eco-fungicide. Repeat every 1 to 2 weeks to keep your roses protected.

3. Make sure you water down the base of your roses because damp leaves encourage fungal spores to multiply!

4. Spotted something sucking the life out of your plant? These little critters are aphids. And they can be black, grey or green but typically they hang out in bunches on the growing tips and cause deformed, shrivelled growth. Under planting your roses with things like garlic and chives may help to deter aphids. And of course make sure you include lots of sweet smelling, brightly coloured flowers – these will help draw in the lady beetles that just love gobbling up aphids!

5. Aphids can also be controlled with a hit of eco-oil. BUT you can actually mix your eco-oil in with eco-fungicide and that way you end up with a super organic to target your rose pest and diseases without harming bees and beneficial insects.

The full range of eco-organic garden products can be found in your local garden centre, nursery or online at: eco organic garden

How to fix a clay soil

Chloe explains how to tell if your soil has a clay content and then how to garden successfully in it! In this video – Chloe gives you the low down on a clay soil and some handy hints on how to garden in it. Lots of compost and eco-flo gypsum are her favourite things to use in a clay soil. To purchase eco-flo gypsum visit: https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/