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Upcycled Succulent Project

I spotted this sad and lonely set of bedside drawers on the roadside ready for a hard rubbish collection….and immediately knew what I wanted to do with them. An upcycled succulent project – yes Succulents in Drawers!

With a bit of prep work and a coat of paint to jazz them up they were ready to go.

My hints when looking for furniture to use as planters;

1. Look for a stury frame and base – you want it to be able to hold the weight of potting mix and plants!

2. Go for something with interesting shape or texture – don’t panic about its colour (you can always change that).

3. Remember your plants will need to either have drainage holes or you’ll need to prep the planter to cope with no drainage holes (see my tip in the video).

4. Hunt down roadside hard rubbish collections, flea markets, second hand stores and your local Facebook Buy Swap Sell or Freebie pages. And remember to keep an open mind!

A coat of paint on your upcycled furniture can make the world of difference to look of the finished piece.

For this upcycled succulent project I’ve chosen to use black spray paint and I’ve masked off some areas so they remain the original timber colour – because I love the contrasting look.

I picked black because I love the way plants really pop against it and because it modernises the retro piece a bit.

I used a wood furniture polish to bring out the colour in the original timber parts too.

For the full instructions on this upcycled succulent project scroll down and watch the video.

And taa daa here it is finished! A upcycled drawer work of art on my front doorstep.

Now my tip for watering these babies is to use either a large needleless syringe (you can get them from pharmacies) or a small watering can with a very narrow spout. Either way they won’t need much water at all and when you do water make sure you direct it at the base of each plant and not over the foliage or over your upcycled drawers.

So start hunting around your local op shops or hard rubbish collections (if you are allowed) and pick up an old neglected piece of furniture and give it an upcycled makeover. You can also check out our other succulent projects or why not try your hand at some creative, inspirational potted garden projects.

Gardenette Chloe x

How to grow plants in pots SUCCESSFULLY!

If you love growing a potted garden, then you’ll need some of these tops tips for success when growing in pots. Let Chloe show you how to grow plants in pots SUCCESSFULLY!

1. Choose the right size pot for your plant. Not too big and not too small. A pot that is too big is a bit of a waste of space and the proportions look all wrong. While a pot that is too small can’t stunt the growth of your plant. As a guide choose a pot that is 2-3 times the size of the original pot of the plant.

2. Choose the right type of pot; self watering pots are perfect for herbs and vegetables or annual flowers. While lightweight pots are great if you need to move pots around a lot.

3. Prevent potting mix from becoming hydrophobic (that’s repelling water) by using a wetting product like eco-hydrate https://ecoorganicgarden.com.au/produ…

Liked this video? Please give it a thumbs up and don’t forget to subscribe. Check out more videos on our channel here- https://www.youtube.com/thegardenettes

Our fav indoor hanging plants

Nothing creates the feeling of an indoor jungle quite like house plants with tarzan like vines cascading down from above. So when you’re decorating your house with greenery, don’t just introduce plants at ground level, spice things up a bit and create interest from top to bottom.

Our favourite indoor hanging, trailing and cascading plants:

– Devil’s Ivy
– Chain of Hearts
– String of Pearls
– Boston Fern

All pots used in this video can be found in the Northcote Pottery Range at https://www.northcotepottery.com/

How to use garden screens

The right screen in the right place can be the difference between an eyesore and a decorative feature in the garden.

I love the look of rusted metal in a garden – I think it adds style and character to outdoor living areas. These outdoor garden screens from Northcote pottery are made from weathering steel so they have a lovely rusted appearance and they come in different patterns and sizes to create privacy, block unsightly views and decorate every corner of the garden.

This bare old fence is screaming out for a makeover, so in go these Moroccan style Geometric screens and what a difference. I’ve broken up the screens with some simple climbing frames so that I can get some greenery growing up here. It’s looking a bit bare at the moment, but I’m planting a beautiful deciduous climber called Boston Ivy. It will create a lovely wall of green in the spring and summer and in autumn it turns beautiful shades of red. So the combination of the rusted screens and colourful foliage will be just stunning.

Now it’s time to update the old gate and give it a new lease on life. Goodbye boring gate palings, hello stylish new entrance. The biggest screens in this range are 1800 x 900mm, which is the standard size of a lot of garden gates – so I just removed the old palings and kept the frame intact, then drilled the screen to the frame and wha la – there’s just no comparison.

I also like to use rusted screens as works of art in the garden and the smaller screens in Northcote Pottery’s collection are just perfect for creating a focal point, dressing up a tired old fence or spicing up a dull wall.

Create a succulent ball

I love a bit of garden art so I’m going to create a living succulent ball that can be a hanging feature in your garden.

Here’s what you’ll need:

2 good sized hanging baskets
A stylish selection of succulents
Quality potting mix
A piece of cardboard
Cable ties
A few pieces of floristy wire

I’m using matching Stratford Hanging Baskets from Northcote Pottery’s Clyde Garden Collection. The detail on them is bird cage like, which is wonderfully decorative and there’s plenty of room for planting succulents.

Start by filling both of the baskets with potting mix. Now the tricky bit is joining the two baskets to form a sphere – so here’s a neat trick. Simply place a piece of cardboard over the top of one of the baskets, put the two halves together and gently slide the cardboard out. Then firmly secure the baskets with cable ties.

Now comes the fun part the planting. I’ve chosen a selection of Echeveria’s from InStyle succulents. I’m using different colors and forms for extra impact. So I’ve got some darker forms like ‘Painted Lady’ which has burgundy coming through the foliage and ‘Black Knight’ which has burgundy or almost black tips and then some silver forms for real contrast.

These plants have been grown as plugs so they’ve only got a small root system which makes them perfect for this style of planting. Now all you need to do is cut little holes into your hanging basket liner and pop them in. If they are a little insecure just get your hands on some floristry wire and you can pin them in.

If you’re finding it tricky to get underneath then try resting the basket on a pot to do the lower half and remember to secure any loose succulents with floristry wire. Now all you need to do is reattach some of the wires from the hanging basket were removed earlier and it’s ready to display in the garden. The perfect garden disco ball!

Dahlia’s Ain’t Dowdy – how to grow beautiful dahlias

Dahlia’s certainly ain’t dowdy! In fact this old-fashioned beauty is making one serious comeback – this diverse group of plants comes in a stunning mix of shades from white and yellows to reds, oranges, pinks and purples and almost black! Even specky bicolour varieties and an array of flower shapes from single varieties that attract the bees, too fancy doubles in every design. You’ll find tall varieties and dwarf types that reach your knees.

You can grow dahlias from tubers which are planted sometime between late winter and spring or through the warmer months you can get them potted like this. Now dahlias like to bask in the sun and they do best in a moist well-drained soil, they also like protection from strong winds particularly the taller varieties.

Dahlias are one of those invaluable plants that burst into bloom in the summer and continue flowing right through until autumn, when a lot of that colour has dropped off. In fact if conditions are right you can get flowers on dahlias right up to a Mother’s Day! So they combined beautifully with other late flowering stars in the perennial border.

When the flowers start to fade just deadhead them to encourage more blooms – simply cut the faded stem back to a pair of leaves to keep the plant looking good. Or better yet harvest the flowers when they’re at their peak and bring them indoors for vases of spectacular colour!